Comic 278 - Rocket Duck and Rocket Fox
28th Dec 2017, 12:00 AM in The Magpie Heritage
Rocket Duck and Rocket Fox
Average Rating: 5 (4 votes) Rate this comic
<< >>
Author Notes:
Microraptor edit delete
Microraptor
Even though Sinistra called it their "old" plane, this is the first time that it gets shown or mentioned in the comic.

"Duck" is in Germany a well known nickname for the Citroën 2CV - but there doesn't seem to be an English equivalent that is firstly commonly known as the nickname for this car, and secondly so easy to make a pun out of.
User comments:
Chippewa Ghost edit delete reply
Chippewa Ghost
DUCK!

ok, that sounded funnier in my head
Microraptor edit delete reply
Microraptor
Ducks are inherently funny, I think!

-------------

(PS: Panel 6 has been in part inspired by this here. I remember that my first assumption, before knowing the proper context, was that he is angrily driving a car...)
The Doodler edit delete reply
The Doodler
This reminds me of the old joke about the Dodge Dart. :P
Microraptor edit delete reply
Microraptor
I don't know that joke, unfortunately. (I guess because Dodges are not that common here in Europe.) I guess it's something pun-heavy, like having to dodge it when it comes darting along, or something like that??
The Doodler edit delete reply
The Doodler
Basically. :P That it sounds more like a warning than the name of a car.
Microraptor edit delete reply
Microraptor
Haha! :-D
Cooke edit delete reply
Cooke
That is one angry man!

The amazing flying Citroën could totally be Batmans weekend batwing. You know, just take it for a nice picnic to the country.
Microraptor edit delete reply
Microraptor
His previously perfectly fine relationship to his girlfriend got utterly destroyed due to Dexter and Sinistra (and since the cat is out of the bag now, he can be sure to face even more negative consequences), so him being super-angry at them is quite understandable! :-D

And yes, the car turned out to look a bit Batmobile-ish. It's the two large black fins on top I guess. (And the angry-looking headlamps, though they are not that visible in this resolution...)
Stilldown (Guest) edit delete reply
Fantomas (the later Jean Marais version, not the Feuillade or Helmut Berger) had a similar flying Ditroen ds (first series). Certainly more streamlined... There's indeed no british nickname as far as I know, although there were some 2CV built in britain and there was even a complete new british car designed on the the "CV frame, called Bijou, but it is so rare I never saw one for real.
Microraptor edit delete reply
Microraptor
I didn't know that about Fantomas - but the "Ente" is an iconic enough car that it doesn't surprise me at all that someone already got the idea to show a flying version (or in general one that is modified in a way that it adds to its "coolness" factor) in a movie.
JammyTheBirb edit delete reply
JammyTheBirb
That is a face of pure fury.
Microraptor edit delete reply
Microraptor
That man's life got ruined! Of course he is furious!
AmeliaP edit delete reply
AmeliaP
This Duck seems a Beetle in my country XD (still, a German car from Volkswagen)
Microraptor edit delete reply
Microraptor
The French Citroën 2CV and the German Volkswagen Beetle are indeed oddly similar in some ways, but as far as I can tell, there seems to be no connection other than perhaps the basic concept. (A car that is not a luxury item, but instead for the common man.)
Stilldown edit delete reply
Stilldown
Although they are often named together with the Mini and R4 as the "small big four", there isn't indeed any connection. The Volkswagen Typ 1 "Käfer" (not to be mixed up with the VW T1, which is indeed Type 2) was a more or less typical streamline car of the interwar period, in fact the only streamline car that went into a real massproduction. (other streamline cars like the famous Tatras, Panhards, the Adler Autobahnwagen or the Chrysler Airflow weren't produced in such huge quantities.)
The Citroen 2cv was a postwar leightweight minimalistic car (although we might trace it back to the tradition of the 1920ies cyclecars, but no connection to the avantgarde streamline design that is still obvious with the early volkswagens, at least the bretzel and ovalis.)
Microraptor edit delete reply
Microraptor
Do you happen to know if Citroën is even a halfway common brand in Latin America (where AmeliaP is from)?
I mean, in contrast, Volkswagen has a factory in Mexico that churned out Beetles for decades - even long after production ceased in Germany itself!
Stilldown edit delete reply
Stilldown
We probably find some of the most important Citroen models imported from france and the factories in spain and portugal, this means surving 11 CV, DS, CX,the H range, Ami, GS, 2CV and surely a few Meharis in latin america.Sadly not many will have survived today. For really being popular, there have to be at least some local factories to produce them.
Most non-european citroen assemblies were founded after Citroen got sold to Peugot, and are of little interest, as this was the PSA-era during which the original citroen models started to dissapear. A notable exception is Chile. They produced an own rare and strange special version of the 2CV, the Citroneta. They factory assembled other models, too, getting the parts from Vigo in spain, so at least a notable number of recognizable citroen models were sold in chile.
Argentina produced the 2CV, the Ami 8 and the Mehari, some should have survived. The factory in brazil is of no interest at all, as they only produced the ugly garbage made since the 2000s, as far as I know.
PS: Chile although built the Yagan, an own version of the light utility vehicle on a 2CV frame built in several other countries under different names. (Best known is the Pony in greece. I drove around in a Citroen Pony in crete as a boy, not at the wheel, of course.)
Stilldown edit delete reply
Stilldown
PS:
image
image
image
Microraptor edit delete reply
Microraptor
That Citroneta does indeed look very similar to the "Ente" - with the most obvious difference being the backside, of course.

This reminds me as an old magazine article that I saw online years ago, of an American magazine (could have been Popular Mechanics) from just after the end of WWII, which was about a certain weird car from the recently defeated Nazi Germany...
It was written in such a way that the authors probably would have considered you crazy if you told them that this car (or more precisely its immediate successor models) will soon become one of the most successful and iconic cars ever...
Stilldown edit delete reply
Stilldown
Popular Mechanics had a lot of very entertaining and curious articles, the only similar german magazine I can think off was the "Hobby".
The Volkswagen was produced in the british sector and the commander claimed that there was no future for that car, but he wasn't an expert, for sure. The concept of a streamlined car with aircooled rearengine wasn't all new (as there were several cars of that concept before the VW, and some similar concepts in postwar times), but there were gigantic facilities build up since the late thirties and a well organized mass production established during the war. Let's not forget, the beetle was already ready developed for production in 1938, and the basic structure was mass produced and tested in world war two. (Some even with the original beetle body, as 2wd and 4wd.)
eekee edit delete reply
eekee
Ahahahhaha! The flying tin snail is wonderful! It took me a bit to remember the English nickname, even after mentioning the escargot paint job. nut yup, that was the tin snail. So much fun to see one as a flying car! XD
Microraptor edit delete reply
Microraptor
Tin snail - somehow that seems so fitting!